Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.

News & Events

Get in touch

1800 437 222

 

 HQ website CTA directory

 

ContentViewArticle Object
(
    [item:protected] => stdClass Object
        (
            [id] => 428
            [asset_id] => 509
            [title] => World Hepatitis Summit 2017
            [alias] => world-hepatitis-summit-2017
            [title_alias] => 
            [introtext] => 

Our CEO, Michelle, travelled to Brazil in October to join the World Hepatitis Alliance's (WHA) World Hepatitis Summit.

109 countries came together to talk about Elimination and the global challenges in addressing HBV and HCV.

The WHA used the platform to launch the No Elimination without Decriminalisation Declaration where members declared concern over the growing gaps between the enormous impact of hepatitis B and hepatitis C over people who use drugs and their almost non-existent access to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services around the world.

You can read a full copy of the Declaration herearton384

The WHO also released the Executive Summary of its Global Hepatitis Report 2017 with the following 6 key statements;

1. Viral Hepatitis is a major public health problem in need of an urgent response;
2. Vaccination dramatically reduced new HBV infections among children, but other HBV and HCV prevention interventions have not been implemented successfully;
3. A large burden of chronic infections among adults calls for greater access to testing and treatment;
4. “Early adopter” countries are on the road to elimination of viral hepatitis;
5. Opportunities for immediate action exist: for example, through expanded treatment for people with HIV who are co-infected with HCV and HBV; and
6. The road to elimination by 2030 requires a comprehensive public health approach taken to scale.

The WHO also provided a checklist for national hepatitis plans and a monitoring and evaluation framework for HBV and HCV elimination which sites 10 core indicators: global and national.

Notable presentations included the Minister for Health – Sao Paolo Brazil.
He very clearly articulated the need for prevention and testing initiatives as much as treatment. In Brazil, the Government has committed to increasing the availability of RAPID testing and are focussing on public awareness campaigns, upskilling and training of health teams with an emphasis on identification and follow up. He noted a particularly high rate of people deemed as lost to follow up. Outstandingly the Government has also committed to the provision of a national resource project.

The presentation by Egypt was also impressive. From a country that at one point had the highest prevalence of HCV globally, they have managed to now sit as one of the top four nations in the elimination journey. Through the implementation of a national screening program they have achieved screening of over 4 million people, 1.4 million have been moved to treatment and they claim a 97% treatment success rate. Their 2020 target is to achieve below 1% prevalence rates.

As a call to action the conference cited 4 activities for civil society. These included:

1. Advocacy
2. Resource mobilisation
3. Awareness
4. Service design

It was also loudly broadcast that stigma and discrimination remain and issue with the following statistics shared:

  • 97% of countries globally report stigma and discrimination as common; 
  • 4% of Governments globally are taking action.

Finally, the challenge moving forward was described as Diagnosis and Awareness.
The following four statements were provided as a solution:

1. Demand access
2. Drive prevention
3. Create support
4. Encourage innovation

[fulltext] => [state] => 1 [mask] => 0 [catid] => 3 [created] => 2017-11-26 23:58:42 [created_by] => 80 [created_by_alias] => [modified] => 2017-12-02 06:26:45 [modified_by] => 80 [checked_out] => 0 [checked_out_time] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00 [publish_up] => 2017-11-26 23:58:42 [publish_down] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00 [images] => [urls] => [attribs] => {"show_title":"","link_titles":"","show_intro":"","show_category":"","link_category":"","show_parent_category":"","link_parent_category":"","show_author":"","link_author":"","show_create_date":"","show_modify_date":"","show_publish_date":"","show_item_navigation":"","show_icons":"","show_print_icon":"","show_email_icon":"","show_vote":"","show_hits":"","show_noauth":"","urls_position":"","alternative_readmore":"","article_layout":"","show_publishing_options":"","show_article_options":"","show_urls_images_backend":"","show_urls_images_frontend":""} [version] => 9 [parentid] => 0 [ordering] => 2 [metakey] => [metadesc] => [access] => 1 [hits] => 155 [metadata] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [robots] => [author] => [rights] => [xreference] => ) ) [featured] => 0 [language] => * [xreference] => [category_title] => News & Events [category_alias] => news-a-events [category_access] => 1 [author] => Jessie [contactid] => [parent_title] => General [parent_id] => 15 [parent_route] => general [parent_alias] => general [rating] => [rating_count] => [params] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [article_layout] => _:default [show_title] => 1 [link_titles] => 0 [show_intro] => 1 [show_category] => 0 [link_category] => 0 [show_parent_category] => 0 [link_parent_category] => 1 [show_author] => 0 [link_author] => 0 [show_create_date] => 0 [show_modify_date] => 0 [show_publish_date] => 0 [show_item_navigation] => 0 [show_vote] => 0 [show_readmore] => 1 [show_readmore_title] => 1 [readmore_limit] => 100 [show_icons] => 0 [show_print_icon] => 0 [show_email_icon] => 0 [show_hits] => 0 [show_noauth] => 0 [urls_position] => 0 [show_publishing_options] => 1 [show_article_options] => 1 [show_urls_images_frontend] => 0 [show_urls_images_backend] => 0 [targeta] => 0 [targetb] => 0 [targetc] => 0 [float_intro] => right [float_fulltext] => right [category_layout] => _:blog [show_category_heading_title_text] => 0 [show_category_title] => 0 [show_description] => 0 [show_description_image] => 0 [maxLevel] => -1 [show_empty_categories] => 0 [show_no_articles] => 1 [show_subcat_desc] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles] => 1 [show_base_description] => 0 [maxLevelcat] => -1 [show_empty_categories_cat] => 0 [show_subcat_desc_cat] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles_cat] => 1 [num_leading_articles] => 1 [num_intro_articles] => 4 [num_columns] => 2 [num_links] => 4 [multi_column_order] => 0 [show_subcategory_content] => 0 [show_pagination_limit] => 1 [filter_field] => hide [show_headings] => 1 [list_show_date] => 0 [date_format] => [list_show_hits] => 1 [list_show_author] => 1 [orderby_pri] => none [orderby_sec] => rdate [order_date] => published [show_pagination] => 2 [show_pagination_results] => 1 [show_feed_link] => 1 [feed_summary] => 0 [feed_show_readmore] => 0 [menu_text] => 1 [show_page_heading] => 0 [secure] => 0 [page_title] => Home [page_description] => Hepatitis Queensland [page_rights] => [robots] => [access-view] => 1 ) ) [slug] => 428:world-hepatitis-summit-2017 [catslug] => 3:news-a-events [parent_slug] => 15:general [readmore_link] => /3-news-a-events/428-world-hepatitis-summit-2017 [text] =>

Our CEO, Michelle, travelled to Brazil in October to join the World Hepatitis Alliance's (WHA) World Hepatitis Summit.

109 countries came together to talk about Elimination and the global challenges in addressing HBV and HCV.

The WHA used the platform to launch the No Elimination without Decriminalisation Declaration where members declared concern over the growing gaps between the enormous impact of hepatitis B and hepatitis C over people who use drugs and their almost non-existent access to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services around the world.

You can read a full copy of the Declaration herearton384

The WHO also released the Executive Summary of its Global Hepatitis Report 2017 with the following 6 key statements;

1. Viral Hepatitis is a major public health problem in need of an urgent response;
2. Vaccination dramatically reduced new HBV infections among children, but other HBV and HCV prevention interventions have not been implemented successfully;
3. A large burden of chronic infections among adults calls for greater access to testing and treatment;
4. “Early adopter” countries are on the road to elimination of viral hepatitis;
5. Opportunities for immediate action exist: for example, through expanded treatment for people with HIV who are co-infected with HCV and HBV; and
6. The road to elimination by 2030 requires a comprehensive public health approach taken to scale.

The WHO also provided a checklist for national hepatitis plans and a monitoring and evaluation framework for HBV and HCV elimination which sites 10 core indicators: global and national.

Notable presentations included the Minister for Health – Sao Paolo Brazil.
He very clearly articulated the need for prevention and testing initiatives as much as treatment. In Brazil, the Government has committed to increasing the availability of RAPID testing and are focussing on public awareness campaigns, upskilling and training of health teams with an emphasis on identification and follow up. He noted a particularly high rate of people deemed as lost to follow up. Outstandingly the Government has also committed to the provision of a national resource project.

The presentation by Egypt was also impressive. From a country that at one point had the highest prevalence of HCV globally, they have managed to now sit as one of the top four nations in the elimination journey. Through the implementation of a national screening program they have achieved screening of over 4 million people, 1.4 million have been moved to treatment and they claim a 97% treatment success rate. Their 2020 target is to achieve below 1% prevalence rates.

As a call to action the conference cited 4 activities for civil society. These included:

1. Advocacy
2. Resource mobilisation
3. Awareness
4. Service design

It was also loudly broadcast that stigma and discrimination remain and issue with the following statistics shared:

  • 97% of countries globally report stigma and discrimination as common; 
  • 4% of Governments globally are taking action.

Finally, the challenge moving forward was described as Diagnosis and Awareness.
The following four statements were provided as a solution:

1. Demand access
2. Drive prevention
3. Create support
4. Encourage innovation

[event] => stdClass Object ( [afterDisplayTitle] => [beforeDisplayContent] => [afterDisplayContent] => ) ) [params:protected] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [article_layout] => _:default [show_title] => 1 [link_titles] => 0 [show_intro] => 1 [show_category] => 0 [link_category] => 0 [show_parent_category] => 0 [link_parent_category] => 1 [show_author] => 0 [link_author] => 0 [show_create_date] => 0 [show_modify_date] => 0 [show_publish_date] => 0 [show_item_navigation] => 0 [show_vote] => 0 [show_readmore] => 1 [show_readmore_title] => 1 [readmore_limit] => 100 [show_icons] => 0 [show_print_icon] => 0 [show_email_icon] => 0 [show_hits] => 0 [show_noauth] => 0 [urls_position] => 0 [show_publishing_options] => 1 [show_article_options] => 1 [show_urls_images_frontend] => 0 [show_urls_images_backend] => 0 [targeta] => 0 [targetb] => 0 [targetc] => 0 [float_intro] => right [float_fulltext] => right [category_layout] => _:blog [show_category_heading_title_text] => 0 [show_category_title] => 0 [show_description] => 0 [show_description_image] => 0 [maxLevel] => -1 [show_empty_categories] => 0 [show_no_articles] => 1 [show_subcat_desc] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles] => 1 [show_base_description] => 0 [maxLevelcat] => -1 [show_empty_categories_cat] => 0 [show_subcat_desc_cat] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles_cat] => 1 [num_leading_articles] => 1 [num_intro_articles] => 4 [num_columns] => 2 [num_links] => 4 [multi_column_order] => 0 [show_subcategory_content] => 0 [show_pagination_limit] => 1 [filter_field] => hide [show_headings] => 1 [list_show_date] => 0 [date_format] => [list_show_hits] => 1 [list_show_author] => 1 [orderby_pri] => none [orderby_sec] => rdate [order_date] => published [show_pagination] => 2 [show_pagination_results] => 1 [show_feed_link] => 1 [feed_summary] => 0 [feed_show_readmore] => 0 [menu_text] => 1 [show_page_heading] => 0 [secure] => 0 [page_title] => Home [page_description] => Hepatitis Queensland [page_rights] => [robots] => [page_heading] => Home ) ) [print:protected] => [state:protected] => JObject Object ( [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [task] => [parameters.menu] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [show_title] => [link_titles] => [show_intro] => [show_category] => [link_category] => [show_parent_category] => [link_parent_category] => [show_author] => [link_author] => [show_create_date] => [show_modify_date] => [show_publish_date] => [show_item_navigation] => [show_vote] => [show_icons] => [show_print_icon] => [show_email_icon] => [show_hits] => [show_noauth] => [urls_position] => [menu-anchor_title] => [menu-anchor_css] => [menu_image] => [menu_text] => 1 [page_title] => [show_page_heading] => 0 [page_heading] => [pageclass_sfx] => [menu-meta_description] => [menu-meta_keywords] => [robots] => [secure] => 0 ) ) [article.id] => 428 [list.offset] => 0 [params] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [article_layout] => _:default [show_title] => 1 [link_titles] => 0 [show_intro] => 1 [show_category] => 0 [link_category] => 0 [show_parent_category] => 0 [link_parent_category] => 1 [show_author] => 0 [link_author] => 0 [show_create_date] => 0 [show_modify_date] => 0 [show_publish_date] => 0 [show_item_navigation] => 0 [show_vote] => 0 [show_readmore] => 1 [show_readmore_title] => 1 [readmore_limit] => 100 [show_icons] => 0 [show_print_icon] => 0 [show_email_icon] => 0 [show_hits] => 0 [show_noauth] => 0 [urls_position] => 0 [show_publishing_options] => 1 [show_article_options] => 1 [show_urls_images_frontend] => 0 [show_urls_images_backend] => 0 [targeta] => 0 [targetb] => 0 [targetc] => 0 [float_intro] => right [float_fulltext] => right [category_layout] => _:blog [show_category_heading_title_text] => 0 [show_category_title] => 0 [show_description] => 0 [show_description_image] => 0 [maxLevel] => -1 [show_empty_categories] => 0 [show_no_articles] => 1 [show_subcat_desc] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles] => 1 [show_base_description] => 0 [maxLevelcat] => -1 [show_empty_categories_cat] => 0 [show_subcat_desc_cat] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles_cat] => 1 [num_leading_articles] => 1 [num_intro_articles] => 4 [num_columns] => 2 [num_links] => 4 [multi_column_order] => 0 [show_subcategory_content] => 0 [show_pagination_limit] => 1 [filter_field] => hide [show_headings] => 1 [list_show_date] => 0 [date_format] => [list_show_hits] => 1 [list_show_author] => 1 [orderby_pri] => none [orderby_sec] => rdate [order_date] => published [show_pagination] => 2 [show_pagination_results] => 1 [show_feed_link] => 1 [feed_summary] => 0 [feed_show_readmore] => 0 [menu_text] => 1 [show_page_heading] => 0 [secure] => 0 [page_title] => Home [page_description] => Hepatitis Queensland [page_rights] => [robots] => [page_heading] => Home ) ) [filter.published] => 1 [filter.archived] => 2 [filter.language] => ) [user:protected] => JUser Object ( [isRoot:protected] => [id] => 0 [name] => [username] => [email] => [password] => [password_clear] => [usertype] => [block] => [sendEmail] => 0 [registerDate] => [lastvisitDate] => [activation] => [params] => [groups] => Array ( ) [guest] => 1 [lastResetTime] => [resetCount] => [_params:protected] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( ) ) [_authGroups:protected] => Array ( [0] => 1 ) [_authLevels:protected] => Array ( [0] => 1 [1] => 1 ) [_authActions:protected] => [_errorMsg:protected] => [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [aid] => 0 ) [_name:protected] => article [_models:protected] => Array ( [article] => ContentModelArticle Object ( [_context:protected] => com_content.article [_item:protected] => Array ( [428] => stdClass Object ( [id] => 428 [asset_id] => 509 [title] => World Hepatitis Summit 2017 [alias] => world-hepatitis-summit-2017 [title_alias] => [introtext] =>

Our CEO, Michelle, travelled to Brazil in October to join the World Hepatitis Alliance's (WHA) World Hepatitis Summit.

109 countries came together to talk about Elimination and the global challenges in addressing HBV and HCV.

The WHA used the platform to launch the No Elimination without Decriminalisation Declaration where members declared concern over the growing gaps between the enormous impact of hepatitis B and hepatitis C over people who use drugs and their almost non-existent access to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services around the world.

You can read a full copy of the Declaration herearton384

The WHO also released the Executive Summary of its Global Hepatitis Report 2017 with the following 6 key statements;

1. Viral Hepatitis is a major public health problem in need of an urgent response;
2. Vaccination dramatically reduced new HBV infections among children, but other HBV and HCV prevention interventions have not been implemented successfully;
3. A large burden of chronic infections among adults calls for greater access to testing and treatment;
4. “Early adopter” countries are on the road to elimination of viral hepatitis;
5. Opportunities for immediate action exist: for example, through expanded treatment for people with HIV who are co-infected with HCV and HBV; and
6. The road to elimination by 2030 requires a comprehensive public health approach taken to scale.

The WHO also provided a checklist for national hepatitis plans and a monitoring and evaluation framework for HBV and HCV elimination which sites 10 core indicators: global and national.

Notable presentations included the Minister for Health – Sao Paolo Brazil.
He very clearly articulated the need for prevention and testing initiatives as much as treatment. In Brazil, the Government has committed to increasing the availability of RAPID testing and are focussing on public awareness campaigns, upskilling and training of health teams with an emphasis on identification and follow up. He noted a particularly high rate of people deemed as lost to follow up. Outstandingly the Government has also committed to the provision of a national resource project.

The presentation by Egypt was also impressive. From a country that at one point had the highest prevalence of HCV globally, they have managed to now sit as one of the top four nations in the elimination journey. Through the implementation of a national screening program they have achieved screening of over 4 million people, 1.4 million have been moved to treatment and they claim a 97% treatment success rate. Their 2020 target is to achieve below 1% prevalence rates.

As a call to action the conference cited 4 activities for civil society. These included:

1. Advocacy
2. Resource mobilisation
3. Awareness
4. Service design

It was also loudly broadcast that stigma and discrimination remain and issue with the following statistics shared:

  • 97% of countries globally report stigma and discrimination as common; 
  • 4% of Governments globally are taking action.

Finally, the challenge moving forward was described as Diagnosis and Awareness.
The following four statements were provided as a solution:

1. Demand access
2. Drive prevention
3. Create support
4. Encourage innovation

[fulltext] => [state] => 1 [mask] => 0 [catid] => 3 [created] => 2017-11-26 23:58:42 [created_by] => 80 [created_by_alias] => [modified] => 2017-12-02 06:26:45 [modified_by] => 80 [checked_out] => 0 [checked_out_time] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00 [publish_up] => 2017-11-26 23:58:42 [publish_down] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00 [images] => [urls] => [attribs] => {"show_title":"","link_titles":"","show_intro":"","show_category":"","link_category":"","show_parent_category":"","link_parent_category":"","show_author":"","link_author":"","show_create_date":"","show_modify_date":"","show_publish_date":"","show_item_navigation":"","show_icons":"","show_print_icon":"","show_email_icon":"","show_vote":"","show_hits":"","show_noauth":"","urls_position":"","alternative_readmore":"","article_layout":"","show_publishing_options":"","show_article_options":"","show_urls_images_backend":"","show_urls_images_frontend":""} [version] => 9 [parentid] => 0 [ordering] => 2 [metakey] => [metadesc] => [access] => 1 [hits] => 155 [metadata] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [robots] => [author] => [rights] => [xreference] => ) ) [featured] => 0 [language] => * [xreference] => [category_title] => News & Events [category_alias] => news-a-events [category_access] => 1 [author] => Jessie [contactid] => [parent_title] => General [parent_id] => 15 [parent_route] => general [parent_alias] => general [rating] => [rating_count] => [params] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [article_layout] => _:default [show_title] => 1 [link_titles] => 0 [show_intro] => 1 [show_category] => 0 [link_category] => 0 [show_parent_category] => 0 [link_parent_category] => 1 [show_author] => 0 [link_author] => 0 [show_create_date] => 0 [show_modify_date] => 0 [show_publish_date] => 0 [show_item_navigation] => 0 [show_vote] => 0 [show_readmore] => 1 [show_readmore_title] => 1 [readmore_limit] => 100 [show_icons] => 0 [show_print_icon] => 0 [show_email_icon] => 0 [show_hits] => 0 [show_noauth] => 0 [urls_position] => 0 [show_publishing_options] => 1 [show_article_options] => 1 [show_urls_images_frontend] => 0 [show_urls_images_backend] => 0 [targeta] => 0 [targetb] => 0 [targetc] => 0 [float_intro] => right [float_fulltext] => right [category_layout] => _:blog [show_category_heading_title_text] => 0 [show_category_title] => 0 [show_description] => 0 [show_description_image] => 0 [maxLevel] => -1 [show_empty_categories] => 0 [show_no_articles] => 1 [show_subcat_desc] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles] => 1 [show_base_description] => 0 [maxLevelcat] => -1 [show_empty_categories_cat] => 0 [show_subcat_desc_cat] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles_cat] => 1 [num_leading_articles] => 1 [num_intro_articles] => 4 [num_columns] => 2 [num_links] => 4 [multi_column_order] => 0 [show_subcategory_content] => 0 [show_pagination_limit] => 1 [filter_field] => hide [show_headings] => 1 [list_show_date] => 0 [date_format] => [list_show_hits] => 1 [list_show_author] => 1 [orderby_pri] => none [orderby_sec] => rdate [order_date] => published [show_pagination] => 2 [show_pagination_results] => 1 [show_feed_link] => 1 [feed_summary] => 0 [feed_show_readmore] => 0 [menu_text] => 1 [show_page_heading] => 0 [secure] => 0 [page_title] => Home [page_description] => Hepatitis Queensland [page_rights] => [robots] => [access-view] => 1 ) ) [slug] => 428:world-hepatitis-summit-2017 [catslug] => 3:news-a-events [parent_slug] => 15:general [readmore_link] => /3-news-a-events/428-world-hepatitis-summit-2017 [text] =>

Our CEO, Michelle, travelled to Brazil in October to join the World Hepatitis Alliance's (WHA) World Hepatitis Summit.

109 countries came together to talk about Elimination and the global challenges in addressing HBV and HCV.

The WHA used the platform to launch the No Elimination without Decriminalisation Declaration where members declared concern over the growing gaps between the enormous impact of hepatitis B and hepatitis C over people who use drugs and their almost non-existent access to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services around the world.

You can read a full copy of the Declaration herearton384

The WHO also released the Executive Summary of its Global Hepatitis Report 2017 with the following 6 key statements;

1. Viral Hepatitis is a major public health problem in need of an urgent response;
2. Vaccination dramatically reduced new HBV infections among children, but other HBV and HCV prevention interventions have not been implemented successfully;
3. A large burden of chronic infections among adults calls for greater access to testing and treatment;
4. “Early adopter” countries are on the road to elimination of viral hepatitis;
5. Opportunities for immediate action exist: for example, through expanded treatment for people with HIV who are co-infected with HCV and HBV; and
6. The road to elimination by 2030 requires a comprehensive public health approach taken to scale.

The WHO also provided a checklist for national hepatitis plans and a monitoring and evaluation framework for HBV and HCV elimination which sites 10 core indicators: global and national.

Notable presentations included the Minister for Health – Sao Paolo Brazil.
He very clearly articulated the need for prevention and testing initiatives as much as treatment. In Brazil, the Government has committed to increasing the availability of RAPID testing and are focussing on public awareness campaigns, upskilling and training of health teams with an emphasis on identification and follow up. He noted a particularly high rate of people deemed as lost to follow up. Outstandingly the Government has also committed to the provision of a national resource project.

The presentation by Egypt was also impressive. From a country that at one point had the highest prevalence of HCV globally, they have managed to now sit as one of the top four nations in the elimination journey. Through the implementation of a national screening program they have achieved screening of over 4 million people, 1.4 million have been moved to treatment and they claim a 97% treatment success rate. Their 2020 target is to achieve below 1% prevalence rates.

As a call to action the conference cited 4 activities for civil society. These included:

1. Advocacy
2. Resource mobilisation
3. Awareness
4. Service design

It was also loudly broadcast that stigma and discrimination remain and issue with the following statistics shared:

  • 97% of countries globally report stigma and discrimination as common; 
  • 4% of Governments globally are taking action.

Finally, the challenge moving forward was described as Diagnosis and Awareness.
The following four statements were provided as a solution:

1. Demand access
2. Drive prevention
3. Create support
4. Encourage innovation

[event] => stdClass Object ( [afterDisplayTitle] => [beforeDisplayContent] => [afterDisplayContent] => ) ) ) [__state_set:protected] => 1 [_db:protected] => JDatabaseMySQL Object ( [name] => mysql [nameQuote:protected] => ` [nullDate:protected] => 0000-00-00 00:00:00 [dbMinimum:protected] => 5.0.4 [_database:JDatabase:private] => hepqldas_joomla [connection:protected] => Resource id #29 [count:protected] => 0 [cursor:protected] => 1 [debug:protected] => [limit:protected] => 0 [log:protected] => Array ( ) [offset:protected] => 0 [sql:protected] => UPDATE #__content SET hits = hits + 1 WHERE id = 428 [tablePrefix:protected] => j25_ [utf:protected] => 1 [errorNum:protected] => 0 [errorMsg:protected] => [hasQuoted:protected] => [quoted:protected] => Array ( ) ) [name:protected] => article [option:protected] => com_content [state:protected] => JObject Object ( [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [task] => [parameters.menu] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [show_title] => [link_titles] => [show_intro] => [show_category] => [link_category] => [show_parent_category] => [link_parent_category] => [show_author] => [link_author] => [show_create_date] => [show_modify_date] => [show_publish_date] => [show_item_navigation] => [show_vote] => [show_icons] => [show_print_icon] => [show_email_icon] => [show_hits] => [show_noauth] => [urls_position] => [menu-anchor_title] => [menu-anchor_css] => [menu_image] => [menu_text] => 1 [page_title] => [show_page_heading] => 0 [page_heading] => [pageclass_sfx] => [menu-meta_description] => [menu-meta_keywords] => [robots] => [secure] => 0 ) ) [article.id] => 428 [list.offset] => 0 [params] => JRegistry Object ( [data:protected] => stdClass Object ( [article_layout] => _:default [show_title] => 1 [link_titles] => 0 [show_intro] => 1 [show_category] => 0 [link_category] => 0 [show_parent_category] => 0 [link_parent_category] => 1 [show_author] => 0 [link_author] => 0 [show_create_date] => 0 [show_modify_date] => 0 [show_publish_date] => 0 [show_item_navigation] => 0 [show_vote] => 0 [show_readmore] => 1 [show_readmore_title] => 1 [readmore_limit] => 100 [show_icons] => 0 [show_print_icon] => 0 [show_email_icon] => 0 [show_hits] => 0 [show_noauth] => 0 [urls_position] => 0 [show_publishing_options] => 1 [show_article_options] => 1 [show_urls_images_frontend] => 0 [show_urls_images_backend] => 0 [targeta] => 0 [targetb] => 0 [targetc] => 0 [float_intro] => right [float_fulltext] => right [category_layout] => _:blog [show_category_heading_title_text] => 0 [show_category_title] => 0 [show_description] => 0 [show_description_image] => 0 [maxLevel] => -1 [show_empty_categories] => 0 [show_no_articles] => 1 [show_subcat_desc] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles] => 1 [show_base_description] => 0 [maxLevelcat] => -1 [show_empty_categories_cat] => 0 [show_subcat_desc_cat] => 1 [show_cat_num_articles_cat] => 1 [num_leading_articles] => 1 [num_intro_articles] => 4 [num_columns] => 2 [num_links] => 4 [multi_column_order] => 0 [show_subcategory_content] => 0 [show_pagination_limit] => 1 [filter_field] => hide [show_headings] => 1 [list_show_date] => 0 [date_format] => [list_show_hits] => 1 [list_show_author] => 1 [orderby_pri] => none [orderby_sec] => rdate [order_date] => published [show_pagination] => 2 [show_pagination_results] => 1 [show_feed_link] => 1 [feed_summary] => 0 [feed_show_readmore] => 0 [menu_text] => 1 [show_page_heading] => 0 [secure] => 0 [page_title] => Home [page_description] => Hepatitis Queensland [page_rights] => [robots] => [page_heading] => Home ) ) [filter.published] => 1 [filter.archived] => 2 [filter.language] => ) [event_clean_cache:protected] => onContentCleanCache [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) ) ) [_basePath:protected] => /home/hepqldasn/public_html/components/com_content [_defaultModel:protected] => article [_layout:protected] => default [_layoutExt:protected] => php [_layoutTemplate:protected] => _ [_path:protected] => Array ( [template] => Array ( [0] => /home/hepqldasn/public_html/templates/if_960_j25/html/com_content/article/ [1] => /home/hepqldasn/public_html/components/com_content/views/article/tmpl/ ) [helper] => Array ( [0] => /home/hepqldasn/public_html/components/com_content/helpers/ ) ) [_template:protected] => /home/hepqldasn/public_html/templates/if_960_j25/html/com_content/article/default.php [_output:protected] => [_escape:protected] => htmlspecialchars [_charset:protected] => UTF-8 [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [baseurl] => [document] => JDocumentHTML Object ( [_links] => Array ( ) [_custom] => Array ( ) [template] => [baseurl] => [params] => [_file] => [_template:protected] => [_template_tags:protected] => Array ( ) [_caching:protected] => [title] => World Hepatitis Summit 2017 [description] => Hepatitis Queensland [link] => [base] => http://hepqld.asn.au/3-news-a-events/428-world-hepatitis-summit-2017 [language] => en-gb [direction] => ltr [_generator] => Joomla! - Open Source Content Management [_mdate] => [_tab] => [_lineEnd] => [_charset] => utf-8 [_mime] => text/html [_namespace] => [_profile] => [_scripts] => Array ( [/media/system/js/mootools-core.js] => Array ( [mime] => text/javascript [defer] => [async] => ) [/media/system/js/core.js] => Array ( [mime] => text/javascript [defer] => [async] => ) [/media/system/js/caption.js] => Array ( [mime] => text/javascript [defer] => [async] => ) ) [_script] => Array ( [text/javascript] => window.addEvent('load', function() { new JCaption('img.caption'); }); ) [_styleSheets] => Array ( ) [_style] => Array ( ) [_metaTags] => Array ( [http-equiv] => Array ( [content-type] => text/html ) [standard] => Array ( [keywords] => Hepatitis Queensland [rights] => [author] => Jessie ) ) [_engine] => [_type] => html [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) ) [pageclass_sfx] => )

World Hepatitis Summit 2017

Our CEO, Michelle, travelled to Brazil in October to join the World Hepatitis Alliance's (WHA) World Hepatitis Summit.

109 countries came together to talk about Elimination and the global challenges in addressing HBV and HCV.

The WHA used the platform to launch the No Elimination without Decriminalisation Declaration where members declared concern over the growing gaps between the enormous impact of hepatitis B and hepatitis C over people who use drugs and their almost non-existent access to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services around the world.

You can read a full copy of the Declaration herearton384

The WHO also released the Executive Summary of its Global Hepatitis Report 2017 with the following 6 key statements;

1. Viral Hepatitis is a major public health problem in need of an urgent response;
2. Vaccination dramatically reduced new HBV infections among children, but other HBV and HCV prevention interventions have not been implemented successfully;
3. A large burden of chronic infections among adults calls for greater access to testing and treatment;
4. “Early adopter” countries are on the road to elimination of viral hepatitis;
5. Opportunities for immediate action exist: for example, through expanded treatment for people with HIV who are co-infected with HCV and HBV; and
6. The road to elimination by 2030 requires a comprehensive public health approach taken to scale.

The WHO also provided a checklist for national hepatitis plans and a monitoring and evaluation framework for HBV and HCV elimination which sites 10 core indicators: global and national.

Notable presentations included the Minister for Health – Sao Paolo Brazil.
He very clearly articulated the need for prevention and testing initiatives as much as treatment. In Brazil, the Government has committed to increasing the availability of RAPID testing and are focussing on public awareness campaigns, upskilling and training of health teams with an emphasis on identification and follow up. He noted a particularly high rate of people deemed as lost to follow up. Outstandingly the Government has also committed to the provision of a national resource project.

The presentation by Egypt was also impressive. From a country that at one point had the highest prevalence of HCV globally, they have managed to now sit as one of the top four nations in the elimination journey. Through the implementation of a national screening program they have achieved screening of over 4 million people, 1.4 million have been moved to treatment and they claim a 97% treatment success rate. Their 2020 target is to achieve below 1% prevalence rates.

As a call to action the conference cited 4 activities for civil society. These included:

1. Advocacy
2. Resource mobilisation
3. Awareness
4. Service design

It was also loudly broadcast that stigma and discrimination remain and issue with the following statistics shared:

  • 97% of countries globally report stigma and discrimination as common; 
  • 4% of Governments globally are taking action.

Finally, the challenge moving forward was described as Diagnosis and Awareness.
The following four statements were provided as a solution:

1. Demand access
2. Drive prevention
3. Create support
4. Encourage innovation

Viral hepatitis (A, B & C)

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver, and it can be caused by a virus or other non-viral causes.  The main difference between the viruses is how they are spread and the effects they have on your health.

Read more...

Prevention

There are safe and effective vaccines that protect you from getting hepatitis A and B.  While there is no vaccine for hep C, by being ‘blood aware’ you can reduce your overall chance of being exposed to the virus.

Read more...

Living with Hepatitis

People with chronic hepatitis can do a number of things to stay healthy including limiting/avoiding alcohol, reducing stress, not smoking, getting regular exercise and eating a healthy diet.

Read more...

Treatment

Effective treatment is available for both chronic hepatitis B and C.  Before you can see a liver specialist to talk about going on treatment, you need to get a referral from your GP first.

Read more...
© copyright 2013 | All Rights Reserved | Website design Brisbane by iFactory