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Viral hepatitis (A, B & C)

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver, and it can be caused by a virus or other non-viral causes.  The main difference between the viruses is how they are spread and the effects they have on your health.

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Prevention

There are safe and effective vaccines that protect you from getting hepatitis A and B.  While there is no vaccine for hep C, by being ‘blood aware’ you can reduce your overall chance of being exposed to the virus.

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Living with Hepatitis

People with chronic hepatitis can do a number of things to stay healthy including limiting/avoiding alcohol, reducing stress, not smoking, getting regular exercise and eating a healthy diet.

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Treatment

Effective treatment is available for both chronic hepatitis B and C.  Before you can see a liver specialist to talk about going on treatment, you need to get a referral from your GP first.

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            [title] => Life-threatening liver conditions Queenslanders urged to Take Action
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            [introtext] => Hepatitis Australia Media Release
For Immediate Use 15 July 2015

Half-a-million Australians living with liver-destroying viruses, as well as governments and communities are being urged to take action to prevent, treat and eradicate hepatitis. Speaking ahead of World Hepatitis Day 2015, the CEO of Hepatitis Queensland said that the annual Awareness Day provides a wonderful opportunity for communities to come together and take action to combat both hepatitis B and C.

“Hepatitis B and C can cause serious liver disease if left untreated, including liver cancer, liver cirrhosis and liver failure. Together, these viruses claim nearly 1,000 Australian lives each year.

“People living with hepatitis B or C may have very few symptoms (or none at all) until the liver becomes severely damaged”. “That’s why its essential Queenslanders who may be at risk of hepatitis B and C take positive action and get tested, and if found positive, speak to their doctor about regular liver check-ups and treatment. These simple actions can save lives,’ he said.

Despite more than 230,000 Australians living with chronic hepatitis C and a further 218,000 living with chronic hepatitis B, each year only one per cent of people with hepatitis C and only around five per cent of people with hepatitis B are treated.1 In Queensland, 68,332 people have been exposed to hepatitis C and 37,427 live with hepatitis B.

There is a safe and effective vaccination for hepatitis B. While there is not a cure for those already living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment can help protect against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.

Recent advances in hepatitis C treatment have resulted in higher cure rates, shorter treatment duration with very few side-effects. “For those Queenslanders living with hepatitis C who want to receive treatment but are waiting for medicines to be PBS listed, it is essential that the Federal Government subsidises these new medicines as soon as possible,” he said.

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day on Tuesday 28 July 2015, Hepatitis Queensland has released a list of actions that Queenslanders can take in the fight to end hepatitis:
  • Understand the risk factors for hepatitis B and C, and protect yourself against these viruses.
  • If you, a family member or friend may have been exposed to hepatitis B or C, talk to a doctor about getting tested and possible vaccination for hepatitis B
  • If you’ve been told that you have hepatitis B or C, talk to your doctor about a regular liver check-up, which is a painless and simple procedure that helps monitor liver health and determine the best time to receive treatment.
  • If you are living with hepatitis, talk to your doctor about treatment options.
  • Governments need to provide funding to expand prevention and treatment programs, subsidise new hepatitis C medicines, increase rates of diagnosis particularly for hepatitis B, and provide regular liver check-ups for all Australians with hepatitis.
“Every Australian has a part to play in the fight against hepatitis. We should take courage from knowing that we have the tools to prevent, test and treat hepatitis B and C and make these rare conditions in our lifetimes. Let’s make it happen,” he said.

For more information on how to get involved with World Hepatitis Day, visit
http://loveyourliver.com.au/worldhepatitisday

World Hepatitis Day (28 July 2015) is one of only eight designated health days endorsed by the World Health Organization as mandated by the World Health Assembly.

Viral hepatitis
  • Without treatment, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can lead to liver scarring (cirrhosis), liver cancer and liver failure.
  • It is important for people who think they might be at risk of hepatitis, or who have been at risk in the past, to get tested.
About hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis B is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact or unprotected sexual contact. A pregnant woman with chronic hepatitis B can transmit the virus to her baby.
  • While vaccination rates are high among people born in Australia, they remain low among many people born overseas. Hepatitis B is endemic in Asia Pacific and Africa and in some remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
  • The best protection against hepatitis B is to get vaccinated. For those living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment provides the best protection against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.
About hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis C is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. Approximately 80 per cent of current infections and 90 per cent of new infections are thought to result from unsafe injecting drug use. Hepatitis C can also be contracted through unsafe tattooing and body piercing practices.
  • There is no vaccine to protect against hepatitis C but the infection can be treated, and, in many cases, cured.
Ends#

For further information or to arrange an interview, please contact Mr Clint Ferndale on 07 3846 0020 at Hepatitis Queensland

References
1. Hepatitis Australia Liver Danger Zone report available:
http://www.liverdangerzone.com.au/report/

Older news:

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For Immediate Use 15 July 2015

Half-a-million Australians living with liver-destroying viruses, as well as governments and communities are being urged to take action to prevent, treat and eradicate hepatitis. Speaking ahead of World Hepatitis Day 2015, the CEO of Hepatitis Queensland said that the annual Awareness Day provides a wonderful opportunity for communities to come together and take action to combat both hepatitis B and C.

“Hepatitis B and C can cause serious liver disease if left untreated, including liver cancer, liver cirrhosis and liver failure. Together, these viruses claim nearly 1,000 Australian lives each year.

“People living with hepatitis B or C may have very few symptoms (or none at all) until the liver becomes severely damaged”. “That’s why its essential Queenslanders who may be at risk of hepatitis B and C take positive action and get tested, and if found positive, speak to their doctor about regular liver check-ups and treatment. These simple actions can save lives,’ he said.

Despite more than 230,000 Australians living with chronic hepatitis C and a further 218,000 living with chronic hepatitis B, each year only one per cent of people with hepatitis C and only around five per cent of people with hepatitis B are treated.1 In Queensland, 68,332 people have been exposed to hepatitis C and 37,427 live with hepatitis B.

There is a safe and effective vaccination for hepatitis B. While there is not a cure for those already living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment can help protect against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.

Recent advances in hepatitis C treatment have resulted in higher cure rates, shorter treatment duration with very few side-effects. “For those Queenslanders living with hepatitis C who want to receive treatment but are waiting for medicines to be PBS listed, it is essential that the Federal Government subsidises these new medicines as soon as possible,” he said.

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day on Tuesday 28 July 2015, Hepatitis Queensland has released a list of actions that Queenslanders can take in the fight to end hepatitis:
  • Understand the risk factors for hepatitis B and C, and protect yourself against these viruses.
  • If you, a family member or friend may have been exposed to hepatitis B or C, talk to a doctor about getting tested and possible vaccination for hepatitis B
  • If you’ve been told that you have hepatitis B or C, talk to your doctor about a regular liver check-up, which is a painless and simple procedure that helps monitor liver health and determine the best time to receive treatment.
  • If you are living with hepatitis, talk to your doctor about treatment options.
  • Governments need to provide funding to expand prevention and treatment programs, subsidise new hepatitis C medicines, increase rates of diagnosis particularly for hepatitis B, and provide regular liver check-ups for all Australians with hepatitis.
“Every Australian has a part to play in the fight against hepatitis. We should take courage from knowing that we have the tools to prevent, test and treat hepatitis B and C and make these rare conditions in our lifetimes. Let’s make it happen,” he said.

For more information on how to get involved with World Hepatitis Day, visit
http://loveyourliver.com.au/worldhepatitisday

World Hepatitis Day (28 July 2015) is one of only eight designated health days endorsed by the World Health Organization as mandated by the World Health Assembly.

Viral hepatitis
  • Without treatment, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can lead to liver scarring (cirrhosis), liver cancer and liver failure.
  • It is important for people who think they might be at risk of hepatitis, or who have been at risk in the past, to get tested.
About hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis B is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact or unprotected sexual contact. A pregnant woman with chronic hepatitis B can transmit the virus to her baby.
  • While vaccination rates are high among people born in Australia, they remain low among many people born overseas. Hepatitis B is endemic in Asia Pacific and Africa and in some remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
  • The best protection against hepatitis B is to get vaccinated. For those living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment provides the best protection against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.
About hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis C is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. Approximately 80 per cent of current infections and 90 per cent of new infections are thought to result from unsafe injecting drug use. Hepatitis C can also be contracted through unsafe tattooing and body piercing practices.
  • There is no vaccine to protect against hepatitis C but the infection can be treated, and, in many cases, cured.
Ends#

For further information or to arrange an interview, please contact Mr Clint Ferndale on 07 3846 0020 at Hepatitis Queensland

References
1. Hepatitis Australia Liver Danger Zone report available:
http://www.liverdangerzone.com.au/report/

Older news:

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For Immediate Use 15 July 2015

Half-a-million Australians living with liver-destroying viruses, as well as governments and communities are being urged to take action to prevent, treat and eradicate hepatitis. Speaking ahead of World Hepatitis Day 2015, the CEO of Hepatitis Queensland said that the annual Awareness Day provides a wonderful opportunity for communities to come together and take action to combat both hepatitis B and C.

“Hepatitis B and C can cause serious liver disease if left untreated, including liver cancer, liver cirrhosis and liver failure. Together, these viruses claim nearly 1,000 Australian lives each year.

“People living with hepatitis B or C may have very few symptoms (or none at all) until the liver becomes severely damaged”. “That’s why its essential Queenslanders who may be at risk of hepatitis B and C take positive action and get tested, and if found positive, speak to their doctor about regular liver check-ups and treatment. These simple actions can save lives,’ he said.

Despite more than 230,000 Australians living with chronic hepatitis C and a further 218,000 living with chronic hepatitis B, each year only one per cent of people with hepatitis C and only around five per cent of people with hepatitis B are treated.1 In Queensland, 68,332 people have been exposed to hepatitis C and 37,427 live with hepatitis B.

There is a safe and effective vaccination for hepatitis B. While there is not a cure for those already living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment can help protect against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.

Recent advances in hepatitis C treatment have resulted in higher cure rates, shorter treatment duration with very few side-effects. “For those Queenslanders living with hepatitis C who want to receive treatment but are waiting for medicines to be PBS listed, it is essential that the Federal Government subsidises these new medicines as soon as possible,” he said.

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day on Tuesday 28 July 2015, Hepatitis Queensland has released a list of actions that Queenslanders can take in the fight to end hepatitis:
  • Understand the risk factors for hepatitis B and C, and protect yourself against these viruses.
  • If you, a family member or friend may have been exposed to hepatitis B or C, talk to a doctor about getting tested and possible vaccination for hepatitis B
  • If you’ve been told that you have hepatitis B or C, talk to your doctor about a regular liver check-up, which is a painless and simple procedure that helps monitor liver health and determine the best time to receive treatment.
  • If you are living with hepatitis, talk to your doctor about treatment options.
  • Governments need to provide funding to expand prevention and treatment programs, subsidise new hepatitis C medicines, increase rates of diagnosis particularly for hepatitis B, and provide regular liver check-ups for all Australians with hepatitis.
“Every Australian has a part to play in the fight against hepatitis. We should take courage from knowing that we have the tools to prevent, test and treat hepatitis B and C and make these rare conditions in our lifetimes. Let’s make it happen,” he said.

For more information on how to get involved with World Hepatitis Day, visit
http://loveyourliver.com.au/worldhepatitisday

World Hepatitis Day (28 July 2015) is one of only eight designated health days endorsed by the World Health Organization as mandated by the World Health Assembly.

Viral hepatitis
  • Without treatment, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can lead to liver scarring (cirrhosis), liver cancer and liver failure.
  • It is important for people who think they might be at risk of hepatitis, or who have been at risk in the past, to get tested.
About hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis B is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact or unprotected sexual contact. A pregnant woman with chronic hepatitis B can transmit the virus to her baby.
  • While vaccination rates are high among people born in Australia, they remain low among many people born overseas. Hepatitis B is endemic in Asia Pacific and Africa and in some remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
  • The best protection against hepatitis B is to get vaccinated. For those living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment provides the best protection against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.
About hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis C is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. Approximately 80 per cent of current infections and 90 per cent of new infections are thought to result from unsafe injecting drug use. Hepatitis C can also be contracted through unsafe tattooing and body piercing practices.
  • There is no vaccine to protect against hepatitis C but the infection can be treated, and, in many cases, cured.
Ends#

For further information or to arrange an interview, please contact Mr Clint Ferndale on 07 3846 0020 at Hepatitis Queensland

References
1. Hepatitis Australia Liver Danger Zone report available:
http://www.liverdangerzone.com.au/report/

Older news:

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For Immediate Use 15 July 2015

Half-a-million Australians living with liver-destroying viruses, as well as governments and communities are being urged to take action to prevent, treat and eradicate hepatitis. Speaking ahead of World Hepatitis Day 2015, the CEO of Hepatitis Queensland said that the annual Awareness Day provides a wonderful opportunity for communities to come together and take action to combat both hepatitis B and C.

“Hepatitis B and C can cause serious liver disease if left untreated, including liver cancer, liver cirrhosis and liver failure. Together, these viruses claim nearly 1,000 Australian lives each year.

“People living with hepatitis B or C may have very few symptoms (or none at all) until the liver becomes severely damaged”. “That’s why its essential Queenslanders who may be at risk of hepatitis B and C take positive action and get tested, and if found positive, speak to their doctor about regular liver check-ups and treatment. These simple actions can save lives,’ he said.

Despite more than 230,000 Australians living with chronic hepatitis C and a further 218,000 living with chronic hepatitis B, each year only one per cent of people with hepatitis C and only around five per cent of people with hepatitis B are treated.1 In Queensland, 68,332 people have been exposed to hepatitis C and 37,427 live with hepatitis B.

There is a safe and effective vaccination for hepatitis B. While there is not a cure for those already living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment can help protect against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.

Recent advances in hepatitis C treatment have resulted in higher cure rates, shorter treatment duration with very few side-effects. “For those Queenslanders living with hepatitis C who want to receive treatment but are waiting for medicines to be PBS listed, it is essential that the Federal Government subsidises these new medicines as soon as possible,” he said.

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day on Tuesday 28 July 2015, Hepatitis Queensland has released a list of actions that Queenslanders can take in the fight to end hepatitis:
  • Understand the risk factors for hepatitis B and C, and protect yourself against these viruses.
  • If you, a family member or friend may have been exposed to hepatitis B or C, talk to a doctor about getting tested and possible vaccination for hepatitis B
  • If you’ve been told that you have hepatitis B or C, talk to your doctor about a regular liver check-up, which is a painless and simple procedure that helps monitor liver health and determine the best time to receive treatment.
  • If you are living with hepatitis, talk to your doctor about treatment options.
  • Governments need to provide funding to expand prevention and treatment programs, subsidise new hepatitis C medicines, increase rates of diagnosis particularly for hepatitis B, and provide regular liver check-ups for all Australians with hepatitis.
“Every Australian has a part to play in the fight against hepatitis. We should take courage from knowing that we have the tools to prevent, test and treat hepatitis B and C and make these rare conditions in our lifetimes. Let’s make it happen,” he said.

For more information on how to get involved with World Hepatitis Day, visit
http://loveyourliver.com.au/worldhepatitisday

World Hepatitis Day (28 July 2015) is one of only eight designated health days endorsed by the World Health Organization as mandated by the World Health Assembly.

Viral hepatitis
  • Without treatment, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can lead to liver scarring (cirrhosis), liver cancer and liver failure.
  • It is important for people who think they might be at risk of hepatitis, or who have been at risk in the past, to get tested.
About hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis B is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact or unprotected sexual contact. A pregnant woman with chronic hepatitis B can transmit the virus to her baby.
  • While vaccination rates are high among people born in Australia, they remain low among many people born overseas. Hepatitis B is endemic in Asia Pacific and Africa and in some remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
  • The best protection against hepatitis B is to get vaccinated. For those living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment provides the best protection against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.
About hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis C is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. Approximately 80 per cent of current infections and 90 per cent of new infections are thought to result from unsafe injecting drug use. Hepatitis C can also be contracted through unsafe tattooing and body piercing practices.
  • There is no vaccine to protect against hepatitis C but the infection can be treated, and, in many cases, cured.
Ends#

For further information or to arrange an interview, please contact Mr Clint Ferndale on 07 3846 0020 at Hepatitis Queensland

References
1. Hepatitis Australia Liver Danger Zone report available:
http://www.liverdangerzone.com.au/report/

Older news:

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Life-threatening liver conditions Queenslanders urged to Take Action

Hepatitis Australia Media Release
For Immediate Use 15 July 2015

Half-a-million Australians living with liver-destroying viruses, as well as governments and communities are being urged to take action to prevent, treat and eradicate hepatitis. Speaking ahead of World Hepatitis Day 2015, the CEO of Hepatitis Queensland said that the annual Awareness Day provides a wonderful opportunity for communities to come together and take action to combat both hepatitis B and C.

“Hepatitis B and C can cause serious liver disease if left untreated, including liver cancer, liver cirrhosis and liver failure. Together, these viruses claim nearly 1,000 Australian lives each year.

“People living with hepatitis B or C may have very few symptoms (or none at all) until the liver becomes severely damaged”. “That’s why its essential Queenslanders who may be at risk of hepatitis B and C take positive action and get tested, and if found positive, speak to their doctor about regular liver check-ups and treatment. These simple actions can save lives,’ he said.

Despite more than 230,000 Australians living with chronic hepatitis C and a further 218,000 living with chronic hepatitis B, each year only one per cent of people with hepatitis C and only around five per cent of people with hepatitis B are treated.1 In Queensland, 68,332 people have been exposed to hepatitis C and 37,427 live with hepatitis B.

There is a safe and effective vaccination for hepatitis B. While there is not a cure for those already living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment can help protect against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.

Recent advances in hepatitis C treatment have resulted in higher cure rates, shorter treatment duration with very few side-effects. “For those Queenslanders living with hepatitis C who want to receive treatment but are waiting for medicines to be PBS listed, it is essential that the Federal Government subsidises these new medicines as soon as possible,” he said.

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day on Tuesday 28 July 2015, Hepatitis Queensland has released a list of actions that Queenslanders can take in the fight to end hepatitis:
  • Understand the risk factors for hepatitis B and C, and protect yourself against these viruses.
  • If you, a family member or friend may have been exposed to hepatitis B or C, talk to a doctor about getting tested and possible vaccination for hepatitis B
  • If you’ve been told that you have hepatitis B or C, talk to your doctor about a regular liver check-up, which is a painless and simple procedure that helps monitor liver health and determine the best time to receive treatment.
  • If you are living with hepatitis, talk to your doctor about treatment options.
  • Governments need to provide funding to expand prevention and treatment programs, subsidise new hepatitis C medicines, increase rates of diagnosis particularly for hepatitis B, and provide regular liver check-ups for all Australians with hepatitis.
“Every Australian has a part to play in the fight against hepatitis. We should take courage from knowing that we have the tools to prevent, test and treat hepatitis B and C and make these rare conditions in our lifetimes. Let’s make it happen,” he said.

For more information on how to get involved with World Hepatitis Day, visit
http://loveyourliver.com.au/worldhepatitisday

World Hepatitis Day (28 July 2015) is one of only eight designated health days endorsed by the World Health Organization as mandated by the World Health Assembly.

Viral hepatitis
  • Without treatment, hepatitis B and hepatitis C can lead to liver scarring (cirrhosis), liver cancer and liver failure.
  • It is important for people who think they might be at risk of hepatitis, or who have been at risk in the past, to get tested.
About hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis B is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact or unprotected sexual contact. A pregnant woman with chronic hepatitis B can transmit the virus to her baby.
  • While vaccination rates are high among people born in Australia, they remain low among many people born overseas. Hepatitis B is endemic in Asia Pacific and Africa and in some remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
  • The best protection against hepatitis B is to get vaccinated. For those living with chronic hepatitis B, ongoing monitoring and treatment provides the best protection against the development of liver disease and liver cancer.
About hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis C is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. Approximately 80 per cent of current infections and 90 per cent of new infections are thought to result from unsafe injecting drug use. Hepatitis C can also be contracted through unsafe tattooing and body piercing practices.
  • There is no vaccine to protect against hepatitis C but the infection can be treated, and, in many cases, cured.
Ends#

For further information or to arrange an interview, please contact Mr Clint Ferndale on 07 3846 0020 at Hepatitis Queensland

References
1. Hepatitis Australia Liver Danger Zone report available:
http://www.liverdangerzone.com.au/report/

Older news:

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