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Viral hepatitis (A, B & C)

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver, and it can be caused by a virus or other non-viral causes.  The main difference between the viruses is how they are spread and the effects they have on your health.

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Prevention

There are safe and effective vaccines that protect you from getting hepatitis A and B.  While there is no vaccine for hep C, by being ‘blood aware’ you can reduce your overall chance of being exposed to the virus.

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Living with Hepatitis

People with chronic hepatitis can do a number of things to stay healthy including limiting/avoiding alcohol, reducing stress, not smoking, getting regular exercise and eating a healthy diet.

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Treatment

Effective treatment is available for both chronic hepatitis B and C.  Before you can see a liver specialist to talk about going on treatment, you need to get a referral from your GP first.

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HepBFamilyTree PNG Transparent

Welcome to the Hepatitis B page!

If you were re-directed here from HepBandMe.com.au, you have come to the right place, but the branches of our tree are still under construction.

The information on this page will tell you everything you need to know about the hepatitis b virus (HBV, hep B), and direct you to other useful pages and resources on hep B.

The HepBandMe.com.au page will be completed in the next few weeks. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, or sign up to our email newsletter to be the first to find out when the new page is up and running.

 

Hepatitis B (HBV)

Hepatitis B is a virus that can cause damage to your liver.  It is sometimes also called ‘hep B’ or ‘HBV’.  Two billion people worldwide have been exposed to hepatitis B and up to 165,000 people in Australia have chronic (long-term) hep B.  Hepatitis B is different to HIV/AIDS, or hepatitis A, C, D or E.

If you have hepatitis B for less than six months, it is called ‘acute’.  If you have it for longer than six months, it is called ‘chronic’.  What happens when you are exposed to hepatitis B depends on how old you are when you get it.

95% of adults who get hepatitis B will ‘clear’ the virus and not develop chronic hep B.  This means your immune system will fight the virus and get rid of it from your body.  You will no longer experience symptoms; you will not be able to pass hepatitis B on to other people and will be immune to hepatitis B in the future.

However, 90% of newborn babies who have hepatitis B will go on to have chronic hep B.  This is because the baby’s immune system is not yet mature and doesn’t recognise the hepatitis B virus as something it should try and clear from the body.  The risk of getting hep B can be reduced by giving the baby the vaccination and HBIg (hepatitis B immunoglobulin) at birth.

How do you get hep B?

  • Blood-to-blood contact
  • Unprotected sexual contact
  • From a mother with hepatitis B to her newborn baby (vertical transmission)

For example…

  • Mother to child during pregnancy/birth
  • Not using a condom during sex (vaginal or anal sex)
  • Contaminated blood transfusions, blood products, medical or dental equipment (this is an issue in many countries, but is rare in Australia)
  • Sharing injecting drug equipment (including syringes, spoons, water, filters and tourniquets)
  • Unsterile cultural or traditional practises that involve blood or skin penetration
  • Unsterile tattooing or piercing
  • Sharing toothbrushes, razors and tweezers
  • Blood-to-blood contact through open wounds
  • Needle-stick injuries (getting hep B this way is rare)
  • Oral sex where they are open cuts, ulcers, or sores in the mouth

How do you know if you have hep B?

A blood test can show if you have had hepatitis B in the past, or if you have it now.  To get tested or find out more information, contact your local doctor, Sexual Health Clinic, Family Planning Clinic or Aboriginal Medical Service, or contact us.

Symptoms

  • General aches and pains
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Light coloured faeces and dark urine

How can you prevent getting hep B?

  • Get vaccinated.  This is the best protection
  • Avoid blood-to-blood contact
  • If you are pregnant and have hep B, talk to your doctor about vaccinations and HBIg for your baby at birth
  • Never share injecting drug equipment (including needles, water, spoons, filters and tourniquets) and dispose of these safely
  • Cover open wounds or cuts with bandaids and clean up any blood spills with disposable gloves and bleach
  • Always get your tattoos and piercings done by a professional who uses sterile equipment
  • Don’t share items that may have traces of blood on them like tweezers, razors or toothbrushes
  • It is safe to breastfeed but if your nipples are cracked or bleeding you should stop temporarily
  • If you are not immunised and you have sexual or blood contact with someone that may have hepatitis B, you should talk to your doctor or clinic about getting vaccinated and HBIg.  HBIg can help your body fight hep B is you have just been exposed to the virus.  You should get the HBIg injection within 72 hours of possible contact

Treatment

Some people with chronic (long-term) hepatitis B may benefit from treatment.  There are currently two types of treatments available.  One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medications, which work by slowing down the replication of the virus.

Treatment may not be appropriate for everyone and sometimes people develop resistance to the medications.  This means the medication may not work as well as it did when you first started.  Ask your doctor for a referral to a liver specialist to discuss whether treatment is right for you, and what type of treatment this should be.

Click here for more information

 

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HepBFamilyTree PNG Transparent

Welcome to the Hepatitis B page!

If you were re-directed here from HepBandMe.com.au, you have come to the right place, but the branches of our tree are still under construction.

The information on this page will tell you everything you need to know about the hepatitis b virus (HBV, hep B), and direct you to other useful pages and resources on hep B.

The HepBandMe.com.au page will be completed in the next few weeks. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, or sign up to our email newsletter to be the first to find out when the new page is up and running.

 

Hepatitis B (HBV)

Hepatitis B is a virus that can cause damage to your liver.  It is sometimes also called ‘hep B’ or ‘HBV’.  Two billion people worldwide have been exposed to hepatitis B and up to 165,000 people in Australia have chronic (long-term) hep B.  Hepatitis B is different to HIV/AIDS, or hepatitis A, C, D or E.

If you have hepatitis B for less than six months, it is called ‘acute’.  If you have it for longer than six months, it is called ‘chronic’.  What happens when you are exposed to hepatitis B depends on how old you are when you get it.

95% of adults who get hepatitis B will ‘clear’ the virus and not develop chronic hep B.  This means your immune system will fight the virus and get rid of it from your body.  You will no longer experience symptoms; you will not be able to pass hepatitis B on to other people and will be immune to hepatitis B in the future.

However, 90% of newborn babies who have hepatitis B will go on to have chronic hep B.  This is because the baby’s immune system is not yet mature and doesn’t recognise the hepatitis B virus as something it should try and clear from the body.  The risk of getting hep B can be reduced by giving the baby the vaccination and HBIg (hepatitis B immunoglobulin) at birth.

How do you get hep B?

  • Blood-to-blood contact
  • Unprotected sexual contact
  • From a mother with hepatitis B to her newborn baby (vertical transmission)

For example…

  • Mother to child during pregnancy/birth
  • Not using a condom during sex (vaginal or anal sex)
  • Contaminated blood transfusions, blood products, medical or dental equipment (this is an issue in many countries, but is rare in Australia)
  • Sharing injecting drug equipment (including syringes, spoons, water, filters and tourniquets)
  • Unsterile cultural or traditional practises that involve blood or skin penetration
  • Unsterile tattooing or piercing
  • Sharing toothbrushes, razors and tweezers
  • Blood-to-blood contact through open wounds
  • Needle-stick injuries (getting hep B this way is rare)
  • Oral sex where they are open cuts, ulcers, or sores in the mouth

How do you know if you have hep B?

A blood test can show if you have had hepatitis B in the past, or if you have it now.  To get tested or find out more information, contact your local doctor, Sexual Health Clinic, Family Planning Clinic or Aboriginal Medical Service, or contact us.

Symptoms

  • General aches and pains
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Light coloured faeces and dark urine

How can you prevent getting hep B?

  • Get vaccinated.  This is the best protection
  • Avoid blood-to-blood contact
  • If you are pregnant and have hep B, talk to your doctor about vaccinations and HBIg for your baby at birth
  • Never share injecting drug equipment (including needles, water, spoons, filters and tourniquets) and dispose of these safely
  • Cover open wounds or cuts with bandaids and clean up any blood spills with disposable gloves and bleach
  • Always get your tattoos and piercings done by a professional who uses sterile equipment
  • Don’t share items that may have traces of blood on them like tweezers, razors or toothbrushes
  • It is safe to breastfeed but if your nipples are cracked or bleeding you should stop temporarily
  • If you are not immunised and you have sexual or blood contact with someone that may have hepatitis B, you should talk to your doctor or clinic about getting vaccinated and HBIg.  HBIg can help your body fight hep B is you have just been exposed to the virus.  You should get the HBIg injection within 72 hours of possible contact

Treatment

Some people with chronic (long-term) hepatitis B may benefit from treatment.  There are currently two types of treatments available.  One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medications, which work by slowing down the replication of the virus.

Treatment may not be appropriate for everyone and sometimes people develop resistance to the medications.  This means the medication may not work as well as it did when you first started.  Ask your doctor for a referral to a liver specialist to discuss whether treatment is right for you, and what type of treatment this should be.

Click here for more information

 

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HepBFamilyTree PNG Transparent

Welcome to the Hepatitis B page!

If you were re-directed here from HepBandMe.com.au, you have come to the right place, but the branches of our tree are still under construction.

The information on this page will tell you everything you need to know about the hepatitis b virus (HBV, hep B), and direct you to other useful pages and resources on hep B.

The HepBandMe.com.au page will be completed in the next few weeks. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, or sign up to our email newsletter to be the first to find out when the new page is up and running.

 

Hepatitis B (HBV)

Hepatitis B is a virus that can cause damage to your liver.  It is sometimes also called ‘hep B’ or ‘HBV’.  Two billion people worldwide have been exposed to hepatitis B and up to 165,000 people in Australia have chronic (long-term) hep B.  Hepatitis B is different to HIV/AIDS, or hepatitis A, C, D or E.

If you have hepatitis B for less than six months, it is called ‘acute’.  If you have it for longer than six months, it is called ‘chronic’.  What happens when you are exposed to hepatitis B depends on how old you are when you get it.

95% of adults who get hepatitis B will ‘clear’ the virus and not develop chronic hep B.  This means your immune system will fight the virus and get rid of it from your body.  You will no longer experience symptoms; you will not be able to pass hepatitis B on to other people and will be immune to hepatitis B in the future.

However, 90% of newborn babies who have hepatitis B will go on to have chronic hep B.  This is because the baby’s immune system is not yet mature and doesn’t recognise the hepatitis B virus as something it should try and clear from the body.  The risk of getting hep B can be reduced by giving the baby the vaccination and HBIg (hepatitis B immunoglobulin) at birth.

How do you get hep B?

  • Blood-to-blood contact
  • Unprotected sexual contact
  • From a mother with hepatitis B to her newborn baby (vertical transmission)

For example…

  • Mother to child during pregnancy/birth
  • Not using a condom during sex (vaginal or anal sex)
  • Contaminated blood transfusions, blood products, medical or dental equipment (this is an issue in many countries, but is rare in Australia)
  • Sharing injecting drug equipment (including syringes, spoons, water, filters and tourniquets)
  • Unsterile cultural or traditional practises that involve blood or skin penetration
  • Unsterile tattooing or piercing
  • Sharing toothbrushes, razors and tweezers
  • Blood-to-blood contact through open wounds
  • Needle-stick injuries (getting hep B this way is rare)
  • Oral sex where they are open cuts, ulcers, or sores in the mouth

How do you know if you have hep B?

A blood test can show if you have had hepatitis B in the past, or if you have it now.  To get tested or find out more information, contact your local doctor, Sexual Health Clinic, Family Planning Clinic or Aboriginal Medical Service, or contact us.

Symptoms

  • General aches and pains
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Light coloured faeces and dark urine

How can you prevent getting hep B?

  • Get vaccinated.  This is the best protection
  • Avoid blood-to-blood contact
  • If you are pregnant and have hep B, talk to your doctor about vaccinations and HBIg for your baby at birth
  • Never share injecting drug equipment (including needles, water, spoons, filters and tourniquets) and dispose of these safely
  • Cover open wounds or cuts with bandaids and clean up any blood spills with disposable gloves and bleach
  • Always get your tattoos and piercings done by a professional who uses sterile equipment
  • Don’t share items that may have traces of blood on them like tweezers, razors or toothbrushes
  • It is safe to breastfeed but if your nipples are cracked or bleeding you should stop temporarily
  • If you are not immunised and you have sexual or blood contact with someone that may have hepatitis B, you should talk to your doctor or clinic about getting vaccinated and HBIg.  HBIg can help your body fight hep B is you have just been exposed to the virus.  You should get the HBIg injection within 72 hours of possible contact

Treatment

Some people with chronic (long-term) hepatitis B may benefit from treatment.  There are currently two types of treatments available.  One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medications, which work by slowing down the replication of the virus.

Treatment may not be appropriate for everyone and sometimes people develop resistance to the medications.  This means the medication may not work as well as it did when you first started.  Ask your doctor for a referral to a liver specialist to discuss whether treatment is right for you, and what type of treatment this should be.

Click here for more information

 

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HepBFamilyTree PNG Transparent

Welcome to the Hepatitis B page!

If you were re-directed here from HepBandMe.com.au, you have come to the right place, but the branches of our tree are still under construction.

The information on this page will tell you everything you need to know about the hepatitis b virus (HBV, hep B), and direct you to other useful pages and resources on hep B.

The HepBandMe.com.au page will be completed in the next few weeks. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, or sign up to our email newsletter to be the first to find out when the new page is up and running.

 

Hepatitis B (HBV)

Hepatitis B is a virus that can cause damage to your liver.  It is sometimes also called ‘hep B’ or ‘HBV’.  Two billion people worldwide have been exposed to hepatitis B and up to 165,000 people in Australia have chronic (long-term) hep B.  Hepatitis B is different to HIV/AIDS, or hepatitis A, C, D or E.

If you have hepatitis B for less than six months, it is called ‘acute’.  If you have it for longer than six months, it is called ‘chronic’.  What happens when you are exposed to hepatitis B depends on how old you are when you get it.

95% of adults who get hepatitis B will ‘clear’ the virus and not develop chronic hep B.  This means your immune system will fight the virus and get rid of it from your body.  You will no longer experience symptoms; you will not be able to pass hepatitis B on to other people and will be immune to hepatitis B in the future.

However, 90% of newborn babies who have hepatitis B will go on to have chronic hep B.  This is because the baby’s immune system is not yet mature and doesn’t recognise the hepatitis B virus as something it should try and clear from the body.  The risk of getting hep B can be reduced by giving the baby the vaccination and HBIg (hepatitis B immunoglobulin) at birth.

How do you get hep B?

  • Blood-to-blood contact
  • Unprotected sexual contact
  • From a mother with hepatitis B to her newborn baby (vertical transmission)

For example…

  • Mother to child during pregnancy/birth
  • Not using a condom during sex (vaginal or anal sex)
  • Contaminated blood transfusions, blood products, medical or dental equipment (this is an issue in many countries, but is rare in Australia)
  • Sharing injecting drug equipment (including syringes, spoons, water, filters and tourniquets)
  • Unsterile cultural or traditional practises that involve blood or skin penetration
  • Unsterile tattooing or piercing
  • Sharing toothbrushes, razors and tweezers
  • Blood-to-blood contact through open wounds
  • Needle-stick injuries (getting hep B this way is rare)
  • Oral sex where they are open cuts, ulcers, or sores in the mouth

How do you know if you have hep B?

A blood test can show if you have had hepatitis B in the past, or if you have it now.  To get tested or find out more information, contact your local doctor, Sexual Health Clinic, Family Planning Clinic or Aboriginal Medical Service, or contact us.

Symptoms

  • General aches and pains
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Light coloured faeces and dark urine

How can you prevent getting hep B?

  • Get vaccinated.  This is the best protection
  • Avoid blood-to-blood contact
  • If you are pregnant and have hep B, talk to your doctor about vaccinations and HBIg for your baby at birth
  • Never share injecting drug equipment (including needles, water, spoons, filters and tourniquets) and dispose of these safely
  • Cover open wounds or cuts with bandaids and clean up any blood spills with disposable gloves and bleach
  • Always get your tattoos and piercings done by a professional who uses sterile equipment
  • Don’t share items that may have traces of blood on them like tweezers, razors or toothbrushes
  • It is safe to breastfeed but if your nipples are cracked or bleeding you should stop temporarily
  • If you are not immunised and you have sexual or blood contact with someone that may have hepatitis B, you should talk to your doctor or clinic about getting vaccinated and HBIg.  HBIg can help your body fight hep B is you have just been exposed to the virus.  You should get the HBIg injection within 72 hours of possible contact

Treatment

Some people with chronic (long-term) hepatitis B may benefit from treatment.  There are currently two types of treatments available.  One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medications, which work by slowing down the replication of the virus.

Treatment may not be appropriate for everyone and sometimes people develop resistance to the medications.  This means the medication may not work as well as it did when you first started.  Ask your doctor for a referral to a liver specialist to discuss whether treatment is right for you, and what type of treatment this should be.

Click here for more information

 

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Hepatits B (HBV)

HepBFamilyTree PNG Transparent

Welcome to the Hepatitis B page!

If you were re-directed here from HepBandMe.com.au, you have come to the right place, but the branches of our tree are still under construction.

The information on this page will tell you everything you need to know about the hepatitis b virus (HBV, hep B), and direct you to other useful pages and resources on hep B.

The HepBandMe.com.au page will be completed in the next few weeks. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, or sign up to our email newsletter to be the first to find out when the new page is up and running.

 

Hepatitis B (HBV)

Hepatitis B is a virus that can cause damage to your liver.  It is sometimes also called ‘hep B’ or ‘HBV’.  Two billion people worldwide have been exposed to hepatitis B and up to 165,000 people in Australia have chronic (long-term) hep B.  Hepatitis B is different to HIV/AIDS, or hepatitis A, C, D or E.

If you have hepatitis B for less than six months, it is called ‘acute’.  If you have it for longer than six months, it is called ‘chronic’.  What happens when you are exposed to hepatitis B depends on how old you are when you get it.

95% of adults who get hepatitis B will ‘clear’ the virus and not develop chronic hep B.  This means your immune system will fight the virus and get rid of it from your body.  You will no longer experience symptoms; you will not be able to pass hepatitis B on to other people and will be immune to hepatitis B in the future.

However, 90% of newborn babies who have hepatitis B will go on to have chronic hep B.  This is because the baby’s immune system is not yet mature and doesn’t recognise the hepatitis B virus as something it should try and clear from the body.  The risk of getting hep B can be reduced by giving the baby the vaccination and HBIg (hepatitis B immunoglobulin) at birth.

How do you get hep B?

  • Blood-to-blood contact
  • Unprotected sexual contact
  • From a mother with hepatitis B to her newborn baby (vertical transmission)

For example…

  • Mother to child during pregnancy/birth
  • Not using a condom during sex (vaginal or anal sex)
  • Contaminated blood transfusions, blood products, medical or dental equipment (this is an issue in many countries, but is rare in Australia)
  • Sharing injecting drug equipment (including syringes, spoons, water, filters and tourniquets)
  • Unsterile cultural or traditional practises that involve blood or skin penetration
  • Unsterile tattooing or piercing
  • Sharing toothbrushes, razors and tweezers
  • Blood-to-blood contact through open wounds
  • Needle-stick injuries (getting hep B this way is rare)
  • Oral sex where they are open cuts, ulcers, or sores in the mouth

How do you know if you have hep B?

A blood test can show if you have had hepatitis B in the past, or if you have it now.  To get tested or find out more information, contact your local doctor, Sexual Health Clinic, Family Planning Clinic or Aboriginal Medical Service, or contact us.

Symptoms

  • General aches and pains
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Light coloured faeces and dark urine

How can you prevent getting hep B?

  • Get vaccinated.  This is the best protection
  • Avoid blood-to-blood contact
  • If you are pregnant and have hep B, talk to your doctor about vaccinations and HBIg for your baby at birth
  • Never share injecting drug equipment (including needles, water, spoons, filters and tourniquets) and dispose of these safely
  • Cover open wounds or cuts with bandaids and clean up any blood spills with disposable gloves and bleach
  • Always get your tattoos and piercings done by a professional who uses sterile equipment
  • Don’t share items that may have traces of blood on them like tweezers, razors or toothbrushes
  • It is safe to breastfeed but if your nipples are cracked or bleeding you should stop temporarily
  • If you are not immunised and you have sexual or blood contact with someone that may have hepatitis B, you should talk to your doctor or clinic about getting vaccinated and HBIg.  HBIg can help your body fight hep B is you have just been exposed to the virus.  You should get the HBIg injection within 72 hours of possible contact

Treatment

Some people with chronic (long-term) hepatitis B may benefit from treatment.  There are currently two types of treatments available.  One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medications, which work by slowing down the replication of the virus.

Treatment may not be appropriate for everyone and sometimes people develop resistance to the medications.  This means the medication may not work as well as it did when you first started.  Ask your doctor for a referral to a liver specialist to discuss whether treatment is right for you, and what type of treatment this should be.

Click here for more information

 

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