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Viral hepatitis (A, B & C)

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver, and it can be caused by a virus or other non-viral causes.  The main difference between the viruses is how they are spread and the effects they have on your health.

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Prevention

There are safe and effective vaccines that protect you from getting hepatitis A and B.  While there is no vaccine for hep C, by being ‘blood aware’ you can reduce your overall chance of being exposed to the virus.

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Living with Hepatitis

People with chronic hepatitis can do a number of things to stay healthy including limiting/avoiding alcohol, reducing stress, not smoking, getting regular exercise and eating a healthy diet.

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Treatment

Effective treatment is available for both chronic hepatitis B and C.  Before you can see a liver specialist to talk about going on treatment, you need to get a referral from your GP first.

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Treatment aims are to stop the hepatitis B virus from multiplying, or to reduce the rate of multiplication as much as possible.  This decreases the risk of serious liver disease developing later in life and makes it possible for the liver to repair some of the damage and to work better.  It is very rare that any of the medications will cure hepatitis B, but it can make the virus inactive.

There are currently two main types of treatments available. One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medication, which works by slowing down the replication of the virus (known as an antiviral effect).  These anti-virals are sometimes called ‘nucleotide’ and ‘nucleoside analogues’.  The Australian Government, through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), funds several different medications to treat chronic hepatitis B. They are:

  • Pegylated Interferon
    Given by injection once a week; usually for six months to one year.  The drug has many potential side effects, such as flu symptoms and depression
  • Lamivudine
    Is a tablet taken once a day for at least one year or longer.  There are almost no side effects; however a significant issue is the possible development of hepatitis B virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance (usually within one year)
  • Adefovir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for one year or longer.  In Australia, Adefovir is only funded for people who have developed a hepatitis B virus mutation after taking Lamivudine.  There are almost no side effects, except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance
  • Entecavir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for up to one year, with almost no side effects except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance.

The main disadvantage of the antiviral tablets (Lamivudine, Adefovir and Entecavir) is sometimes the hepatitis B virus mutates (changes) during the course of treatment, which means the antiviral tablets are not as effective against the new form of the virus. This is called antiviral resistance.  During treatment, your blood tests are monitored very carefully to look for signs of antiviral resistance.  If there are signs of resistance such as elevated liver enzymes and high levels of hepatitis B virus in the blood, the antiviral tablets will be changed.

Click here for more information

 

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Treatment aims are to stop the hepatitis B virus from multiplying, or to reduce the rate of multiplication as much as possible.  This decreases the risk of serious liver disease developing later in life and makes it possible for the liver to repair some of the damage and to work better.  It is very rare that any of the medications will cure hepatitis B, but it can make the virus inactive.

There are currently two main types of treatments available. One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medication, which works by slowing down the replication of the virus (known as an antiviral effect).  These anti-virals are sometimes called ‘nucleotide’ and ‘nucleoside analogues’.  The Australian Government, through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), funds several different medications to treat chronic hepatitis B. They are:

  • Pegylated Interferon
    Given by injection once a week; usually for six months to one year.  The drug has many potential side effects, such as flu symptoms and depression
  • Lamivudine
    Is a tablet taken once a day for at least one year or longer.  There are almost no side effects; however a significant issue is the possible development of hepatitis B virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance (usually within one year)
  • Adefovir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for one year or longer.  In Australia, Adefovir is only funded for people who have developed a hepatitis B virus mutation after taking Lamivudine.  There are almost no side effects, except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance
  • Entecavir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for up to one year, with almost no side effects except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance.

The main disadvantage of the antiviral tablets (Lamivudine, Adefovir and Entecavir) is sometimes the hepatitis B virus mutates (changes) during the course of treatment, which means the antiviral tablets are not as effective against the new form of the virus. This is called antiviral resistance.  During treatment, your blood tests are monitored very carefully to look for signs of antiviral resistance.  If there are signs of resistance such as elevated liver enzymes and high levels of hepatitis B virus in the blood, the antiviral tablets will be changed.

Click here for more information

 

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=> hepatitis-b-treatment-options [title_alias] => [introtext] =>

Treatment aims are to stop the hepatitis B virus from multiplying, or to reduce the rate of multiplication as much as possible.  This decreases the risk of serious liver disease developing later in life and makes it possible for the liver to repair some of the damage and to work better.  It is very rare that any of the medications will cure hepatitis B, but it can make the virus inactive.

There are currently two main types of treatments available. One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medication, which works by slowing down the replication of the virus (known as an antiviral effect).  These anti-virals are sometimes called ‘nucleotide’ and ‘nucleoside analogues’.  The Australian Government, through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), funds several different medications to treat chronic hepatitis B. They are:

  • Pegylated Interferon
    Given by injection once a week; usually for six months to one year.  The drug has many potential side effects, such as flu symptoms and depression
  • Lamivudine
    Is a tablet taken once a day for at least one year or longer.  There are almost no side effects; however a significant issue is the possible development of hepatitis B virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance (usually within one year)
  • Adefovir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for one year or longer.  In Australia, Adefovir is only funded for people who have developed a hepatitis B virus mutation after taking Lamivudine.  There are almost no side effects, except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance
  • Entecavir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for up to one year, with almost no side effects except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance.

The main disadvantage of the antiviral tablets (Lamivudine, Adefovir and Entecavir) is sometimes the hepatitis B virus mutates (changes) during the course of treatment, which means the antiviral tablets are not as effective against the new form of the virus. This is called antiviral resistance.  During treatment, your blood tests are monitored very carefully to look for signs of antiviral resistance.  If there are signs of resistance such as elevated liver enzymes and high levels of hepatitis B virus in the blood, the antiviral tablets will be changed.

Click here for more information

 

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Treatment aims are to stop the hepatitis B virus from multiplying, or to reduce the rate of multiplication as much as possible.  This decreases the risk of serious liver disease developing later in life and makes it possible for the liver to repair some of the damage and to work better.  It is very rare that any of the medications will cure hepatitis B, but it can make the virus inactive.

There are currently two main types of treatments available. One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medication, which works by slowing down the replication of the virus (known as an antiviral effect).  These anti-virals are sometimes called ‘nucleotide’ and ‘nucleoside analogues’.  The Australian Government, through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), funds several different medications to treat chronic hepatitis B. They are:

  • Pegylated Interferon
    Given by injection once a week; usually for six months to one year.  The drug has many potential side effects, such as flu symptoms and depression
  • Lamivudine
    Is a tablet taken once a day for at least one year or longer.  There are almost no side effects; however a significant issue is the possible development of hepatitis B virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance (usually within one year)
  • Adefovir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for one year or longer.  In Australia, Adefovir is only funded for people who have developed a hepatitis B virus mutation after taking Lamivudine.  There are almost no side effects, except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance
  • Entecavir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for up to one year, with almost no side effects except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance.

The main disadvantage of the antiviral tablets (Lamivudine, Adefovir and Entecavir) is sometimes the hepatitis B virus mutates (changes) during the course of treatment, which means the antiviral tablets are not as effective against the new form of the virus. This is called antiviral resistance.  During treatment, your blood tests are monitored very carefully to look for signs of antiviral resistance.  If there are signs of resistance such as elevated liver enzymes and high levels of hepatitis B virus in the blood, the antiviral tablets will be changed.

Click here for more information

 

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Hepatitis B Treatment Options

Treatment aims are to stop the hepatitis B virus from multiplying, or to reduce the rate of multiplication as much as possible.  This decreases the risk of serious liver disease developing later in life and makes it possible for the liver to repair some of the damage and to work better.  It is very rare that any of the medications will cure hepatitis B, but it can make the virus inactive.

There are currently two main types of treatments available. One is Pegylated Interferon, which is aimed at boosting your immune system and its ability to clear the hepatitis B virus from your body.  Another type of treatment is anti-viral medication, which works by slowing down the replication of the virus (known as an antiviral effect).  These anti-virals are sometimes called ‘nucleotide’ and ‘nucleoside analogues’.  The Australian Government, through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), funds several different medications to treat chronic hepatitis B. They are:

  • Pegylated Interferon
    Given by injection once a week; usually for six months to one year.  The drug has many potential side effects, such as flu symptoms and depression
  • Lamivudine
    Is a tablet taken once a day for at least one year or longer.  There are almost no side effects; however a significant issue is the possible development of hepatitis B virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance (usually within one year)
  • Adefovir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for one year or longer.  In Australia, Adefovir is only funded for people who have developed a hepatitis B virus mutation after taking Lamivudine.  There are almost no side effects, except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance
  • Entecavir
    Is a tablet taken once a day for up to one year, with almost no side effects except for the possibility of developing virus mutations and antiviral drug resistance.

The main disadvantage of the antiviral tablets (Lamivudine, Adefovir and Entecavir) is sometimes the hepatitis B virus mutates (changes) during the course of treatment, which means the antiviral tablets are not as effective against the new form of the virus. This is called antiviral resistance.  During treatment, your blood tests are monitored very carefully to look for signs of antiviral resistance.  If there are signs of resistance such as elevated liver enzymes and high levels of hepatitis B virus in the blood, the antiviral tablets will be changed.

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